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The Hinge of Fate Second World War

Free read ✓ The Hinge of Fate Second World War 107 Vement it is universally acknowledged as a magnificent reconstruction and is an enduring compelling work that led to his being awarded the Nobel Prize for literature The Hinge of Fate describes how the tide of the war gradua. So everyone out there pop uiz Who knew before now that just after the United States entered WWII our shipping was attacked constantly by the German Navy even just off shore of New Orleans and in the Chesapeake Bay and all around Florida We didn t have very effective anti submarine defense at the time and they picked off ships at will Even to the point of picking and choosing which ships to sink Two thirds of the ships that went down were tankers since they were the most important 70 ships were lost in 6 months Most of the AmericanHello I had never heard this before All I have heard is we were never attacked on American soil except for Pearl Harbor which almost doesn t count and 9 11 OK so this isn t soil but right offshore should count for something I have asked various people and no one had heard this before We tend to edit out losing things from our histories I supposeI knew that the desert war turned around at El Alamein but I never knew just how close to Cairo and all the important stuff in Egypt it was Had Rommel won there things would have turned out much different But he didn t and this was the battle Churchill calls the Hinge of Fate because it was the beginning of the Allied victories After this they didn t lose any major battles Practical Pedology (Ellis Horwood series in soil science) it Tahinta: A Rhythm Play for Children is universally acknowledged as a magnificent reconstruction and Harlequin Intrigue November 2013 - Bundle 1 of 2 is an enduring compelling work that led to his being awarded the Nobel Prize for literature The Hinge of Fate describes how the tide of the war gradua. So everyone out there pop uiz Who knew before now that just after the United States entered WWII our shipping was attacked constantly by the German Navy even just off shore of New Orleans and The Fifth Miracle The Search for the Origin and Meaning of Life in the Chesapeake Bay and all around Florida We didn t have very effective anti submarine defense at the time and they picked off ships at will Even to the point of picking and choosing which ships to sink Two thirds of the ships that went down were tankers since they were the most Desistance important 70 ships were lost Exploits of a Reluctant But Extremely Goodlooking Hero in 6 months Most of the AmericanHello I had never heard this before All I have heard Polygamy Was Better Than Monotony to My Grandfathers and Their Plural Wives is we were never attacked on American soil except for Pearl Harbor which almost doesn t count and 9 11 OK so this Batman Death and the City isn t soil but right offshore should count for something I have asked various people and no one had heard this before We tend to edit out losing things from our histories I supposeI knew that the desert war turned around at El Alamein but I never knew just how close to Cairo and all the Two Slatterns and a King important stuff Powder Burn The Executioner #387 in Egypt Alexander Hamilton and the Idea of Republican Government it was Had Rommel won there things would have turned out much different But he didn t and this was the battle Churchill calls the Hinge of Fate because The Atom and the Apple Twelve Tales from Contemporary Physics it was the beginning of the Allied victories After this they didn t lose any major battles

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Free read ✓ The Hinge of Fate Second World War 107 Lly turned for Britain and its allies from constant defeat to almost unbroken successes Japan's successful assault on the Pacific Britain's attempts to aid a beleaguered Russia and the defeat of Rommel at the Battle of Alame. I haven t read all of this I have read all of Mr Churchill s narrative and a good many telegrams and reports and even Personal Minutes to various and sundry high ranking officials Our library has the full set of these memoirs and I have considered giving them a try for many years but it was not until I saw one of the codgers in the movie The Bucket List reading just this the fourth volume that I finally got down to it The preface is intriguing I have called this volume The Hinge of Fate because in it we turn from almost uninterrupted disaster to almost unbroken success For the first six months of this story all went ill for the last six months everything went well p vi And then come Moral of the WorkIn War ResolutionIn Defeat DefianceIn Victory MagnanimityIn Peace Good WillTheme of the Volume How the power of the Grand Alliance become preponderant The Grand Alliance is that between the US particularly but also the Soviet Union This new year of the Second World War 1942 opened upon us in an entirely different shape for Britain We were no longer alone At our side stood two mighty Allies Russia and the United States were though for different reasons irrevocably engaged to fight to the death in the closest concert with the British Empire This combination made final victory certain p 3 The mention of the British Empire is a recurring theme Soldiers from Australia New Zeeland South Africa and India form a large part of the Eighth Army in North Africa and there is considerable politics involved in keeping them up to the mark Early on Australia feels threatened by Japan reasonably so and wants their troops back Mr Churchill is pressed to explain why they can t have themThis whole North Africa campaign is something I have never really understood The French the Vichy French had large colonies in the west and Britain had control of Egypt and the Suez in the east Nazi Germany needed oil but surely the Middle East would have been a better target Another uestion which I found increasingly confusing was why the Germans did not invade Malta They had already taken Crete yet Malta remained in British possession from which air strikes on shipping from Italy to North Africa could be launched and convoys and war ships could find a relatively well protected harbour That the British had great trouble supplying Malta caused Mr Churchill considerable deliberation Yet it was supplied and remained a threat Mr Churchill had a pet project called Jupiter an invasion of northern Norway The purpose was to capture a couple of airfields which could be used as bases for bombers and fighters protecting the convoys running from the US to Murmansk This sounds like a good idea to me but despite his efforts in pushing it forward the project never came off Mr Churchill s callousness is apparent in planning this during the invasionit seems unlikely that than one fifth or one sixth of the transports and covering craft would be sunk A military attack is not ruled out simply because a fifth of the soldiers my be shot on the way provided the others get there and do the job p 352The story though begins in the far east as the Japanese march through Malaya and then take Singapore the major British fortress It is not until later when he is informed of the fall of Tobruk that he truly expresses his feelings This was the fortress that had resisted a siege by Rommel s German and Italian forces for 241 days only a year earlier At the time of this disaster Mr Churchill was in the US with Franklin Roosevelt and Harry HopkinsIn a few minutes he general Ismay brought the following message which had just arrived from Admiral Harwood at Alexandria Tobruk has fallen and situation deteriorated so much that there is a possibility of heavy air attack on Alexandria in near future This was one of the heaviest blows I can recall during the war Not only were its military effects grievous but it had affected the reputation of the British armies At Singapore 85000 men had surrendered to inferior numbers of Japanese Now in Tobruk a garrison of 25000 actually 33000 seasoned soldiers had laid down their arms to perhaps one half of their number If this was typical of the morale of the Desert Army no measure could be put upon the disasters which impended in Northeast Africa I did not attempt to hide from the President the shock I had received It was a bitter moment Defeat is one thing disgrace is another Nothing could exceed the sympathy and chivalry of my two friends There were no reproaches not an unkind word was spoken What can we do to help said Roosevelt p 382 3 The answer of course was Give us as many Sherman tanks as you can spare and ship them to the Middle East as uickly as possible Well we know how it went but considerable of the charm of this book is that at the time no one knew After the Japanese had also taken Burma Mr Churchill feared for both India and Ceylon He also feared that the Axis would sweep on through Egypt as he expressed in a message to General Auchinleck on 25 June 42 I hope the crisis will lead to all uniformed personnel in the Delta and all available loyal man power being raised to the highest fighting condition You have over seven hundred thousand men on your ration strength in the Middle East Every fit male should be made to fight and die for victory There is no reason why units defending the Mersa Matruh position should not be reinforced by several thousands of officers and administrative personnel ordered to swell the battalions or working parties You are in the same kind of situation as we should be if England were invaded and the same intense drastic spirit should reign p 389 After being driven from Mersa Matruh there is a change of command and on 30 June 42 Prime Minister to Minister of State you should insist upon the mobilisation for battle of all the rearward services Everybody in uniform must fight exactly like they would if Kent or Sussex were invaded Tank hunting parties with sticky bombs and bombards defence to the death of every fortified area or strong building making every post a winning post and every ditch a last ditch This is the spirit you have got to inculcate No general evacuation no playing for safety Egypt must be held at all costs p 425 6 The man does have a way with words Every post a winning post and every ditch a last ditch Meanwhile over in Russia the Soviet resistance was stiffening Mr Churchill is clearly ambivalent here I feel we at least deserve credit for our patience in the face of ceaseless affront from a Government which had been hoping to work with Hitler until it was assaulted and almost destroyed by him This is however the point at which to tell all too briefly the tale of the magnificent struggle and decisive victory of the Russian Armies p 582Mr Churchill regrets freuently that the western allies have not been able to relieve the pressure of the Axis armies on the Soviet Union by an invasion of France in 1942 or even in 1943 Not even obliuely does he admit that Commies and Nazis killing each other could be a good thing Prime Minister to General Ismay for COS Chiefs of Staff Committee 4 Mar 43I feel so very conscious of the poor contribution the British and American Armies are making in only engaging perhaps a dozen German divisions during the greater part of this year while Stalin is facing 185 that I should not be prepared myself to court the certain rebuff which would attend a reuest for information as to his plans p 935 Throughout the struggle there is still class consciousness as revealed in a message from General Alexander to Prime Minister and CIGS Chief of the Imperial General Staff 1 Nov 42 during the battle of Alamein Best estimate of casualties up to 6 AM October 31 killed wounded and missing officers 695 other ranks 9435 p 597That this was a an all out struggle is made evident in for example the Prime Minister s Personal Minutes Prime Minister to Secretary of State for War CIGS and Minister of Production 8 May 423 1700000 is the figure given for men in the Home Guard My latest figure is 1450000 of which only 840000 have rifles Of course those with rifles are relieved by those without and they all ought to be trained but surely the emphasis should be on getting a number trained in shooting eual to the rifles issued Let me know what is the plan about this 4 I still think that in view of the immense uantities of30 ammunition now being produced in America 319000000 rounds in March for instance we ought to try to get another 100000000 over to improve holdings of the Home Guard and for practice I should be willing to make an effort for this p 859 These Personal Minutes are often interesting as Mr Churchill gets after his various Ministers Secretary s Sea Lords and Generals As for example Prime Minister to Minister of Aircraft Production 13 May 42 Your latest returns shows that you have 1797 aircraft in preparation These are presumably in addition to the 649 ready and ready within four days The shortage of aircraft at the present moment is acute Now is the time for you to bring forward this reserve of 1797 which are presumably defective in this or that spare part Lord Beaverbrook in 1940 gained great advantages for us by a searching analysis and scrutiny of the machines in the Air Supply Units What we want now is aircraft in the front line Get at it and bite at it p 860 He can also offer praise Prime Minister to Minister of Labour 24 Sept 42 I have read with great interest your note describing what has been achieved in the man power field during the year ended last June I see that you drafted nearly a million men and women into the Services thereby fulfilling the great bulk of their reuirements and at the same time added 80000 to the labour force on munitions I congratulate you on this great performance p 901 The view is of course von oben as for example in the Battle of the Atlantic when he reports gross tons of shipping lost and also the number of ships lost but nothing about the number of lives lost Still I found this interesting especially when the narrator is as dedicated and involved as Mr Churchill From worrying and writing to those in charge about the distribution of flowers to the larger cities providing a ration of sugar for bee keepers reviewing a typical standard infantry battalion or ordering increased air attacks on transport convoys or defending himself in Parliament or planning an invasion of West Africa or Sicily or sweetening the Free French and the Russians and the Americans while travelling to Africa and America no job is too large or too small

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Free read ✓ The Hinge of Fate Second World War 107 Winston Churchill's six volume history of the cataclysm that swept the world remains the definitive history of the Second World War Lucid dramatic remarkable both for its breadth and sweep and for its sense of personal invol. I ought to have known My advisers ought to have known and I ought to have been told and I ought to have asked Winston Churchill s WWII series has turned out to be intriguing reading albeit very long reading This volume is the first one in the series where relief not much but relief nevertheless starts to show After the first three volumes focused on one disaster after another Churchill leads the reader to what he feels is the turning point of the war The British people can face peril or misfortune with fortitude and buoyancy but they bitterly resent being deceived or finding that those responsible for their affairs are themselves dwelling in a fool s paradiseThe fall of Singapore deeply hurt Churchill who tried to fathom why 80000 Commonwealth troops could simply surrender He also had to deal with the sullen sinister Bolshevik State of Stalin s Soviet Union which had originally partnered with Hitler with the objective of gleefully dividing the British Empire only to run afoul of Hitler and Prussian pride Then there were the Yanks Would they eventually join the fight And if they did would that single step portend their eventual rise to their own empire I was attracted by the goldfish Churchill on MoscowThis is not a book for those simply wanting a uick review of World War II This is Churchill This is 1000 pages of memos personal thoughts letters telegrams military notes and a wonderful appendix filled with enough data to satisfy any modern day chart fanatic This is why it takes a long time to complete as you think you re reading a straightforward account only to discover that Mr Churchill wants you to really read each sentence and oh how enjoyable it all becomesStalin Why should we not go to my house and have some drinksChurchill I said that I was in principle always in favour of such a policyThe Hinge in Churchill s view is the British victory in North Africa But it s also the Soviets stout infantry defence of Stalingrad and the Americans naval rebound in the Pacific If one had no idea of the eventual outcome of the war it becomes clear that the tide had begun to turn in favour of the Allies In the night all cats are greyChurchill s ambivalence toward Darlan s Vichy French so much for Vichy and the Free French De Gaulle as the new Joan of Arc makes for wonderful reading as his disgust at their infighting makes for glorious bon mots His fractious relationship with Stalin in his heartso far as he has one and his between the lines read of the Americans are worth the slowing down and double takes as in did he actually just say that it was the Americans by their high tariff policy who led the world astray it is pretty good cheek of them now coming to school marm us into proper behaviourClassic Churchill Book Season Spring you ll need as many seasons as possible