[Isaac Newton Books ] Free Read as Epub ✓ James Gleick – Kindle ePUB & PDF

Free download á PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free è James Gleick

Isaac Newton Download Ø 105 Thor of Chaos and Genius and one of the most acclaimed science writers of his generation brings the reader into Newton’s reclusive life and provides startlingly clear explanations of the concepts that changed forever our perception of bodies rest and motion Ideas so basic to the twenty first century we literally take them for grante. Previous biographies I read have spoiled me so that I can only say that this book is a competent little introduction to the life and work of Isaac Newton that leaves me hungry for And I hear that Never at rest by Richard S Westfall is excellent This is perfect light reading for these times

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Isaac Newton Download Ø 105 Isaac Newton was born in a stone farmhouse in 1642 fatherless and unwanted by his mother When he died in London in 1727 he was so renowned he was given a state funeral an unheard of honor for a subject whose achievements were in the realm of the intellect During the years he was an irascible presence at Trinity College Cambridge Newto. I read this to compliment my reading of uiet by Susan Cain thinking that studying the life of one of the most famous introverts will give me greater insightBut all James Gleick provides is a cursory summary of Newton s work and hardly touches on his personal life and not at all on his character or personality The book is also a history of the enlightenment age the growth of the Royal Society of the rivalries that drove its growth and the role they played in transmission of informationHow can one understand a man willing to fill millions of words worth of pages with new and imaginative thrusts into the unknown with no intention to publish and only giving them away in reluctant small portions a man who took 30 years to publish his greatest work Even after he became famous he resorted to publishing under the cloak of anonymity about his own works as well as his criticsNewton was told by his well wishers that this withholding of his work only helped in losing recognition for himself and benefit for others This was sadly illustrated when Leibniz published his own version of Calculus this prompted Newton to finally bring out his own better and earlier version and start a fiery rivalry which overshadowed their achievements and constricted the growth of mathematics for almost a decade But one good thing did came out of this Newton started bringing out texts that he had kept hidden till thenHe was also a dedicated pursuer of biblical and ancient texts convinced that the ancients knew secrets hidden in these symbolisms Another strange fact was that Newton made money from being in charge of the public money minting office than from his scientific enuiries He was the one who standardized England s currency and made major contributions to economics and public policy tooThe most intriguing part of the book is when Gleick details out Newton The Alchemist probably the greatest of the esoteric order It was another of the various facets of his life and enuiry that he never made public and came to light only years after his death This was in fact the cause of his death the mercury poisoning that resulted from his fascinated constant handling of uicksilver which he believed to be the essence of all metalsWhile I cannot say that the book was of much use in aiding an understanding of Newton the man or that it was a detailed history of his thoughts and works at the very least I will never talk about how modern science killed Newtonian Physics His vision of the universe was as metaphysical as the latest uantum advances even though the most critics he ever had in his life was for these very metaphysical elements in his Optics He was careful to only present to the public those ideas which he could back up by experimentation but this does not mean that this powerful mind did not explore and push the same boundaries that we now grapple with in the vast eternities of his solitudeHe was a scientist alchemist philosopher epistemologist economist a theologian and the last of the magicians combining and distilling all of this vast knowledge into the simple truths that we all know today Newton was a great of the modern age not of a uaint age which we have surpassed as we like to imagine I would like to agree with Byron as he sang Man fell with apples and with apples rose Desperately Seeking Someone Life Goes On Desperately Seeking Someone #2 years he was an irascible presence at Trinity College Cambridge Newto. I read this to compliment my reading of uiet by Susan Cain thinking that studying the life of one of the most famous introverts will give me greater insightBut all James Gleick provides is a cursory summary of Newton s work and hardly touches on his personal life and not at all on his character or personality The book is also a history of the enlightenment age the growth of the Royal Society of the rivalries that drove its growth and the role they played in transmission of informationHow can one understand a man willing to fill millions of words worth of pages with new and imaginative thrusts into the unknown with no intention to publish and only giving them away in reluctant small portions a man who took 30

Free download á PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free è James Gleick

Isaac Newton Download Ø 105 N imagined properties of nature and gave them names mass gravity velocity things our science now takes for granted Inspired by Aristotle spurred on by Galileo’s discoveries and the philosophy of Descartes Newton grasped the intangible and dared to take its measure a leap of the mind unparalleled in his generationJames Gleick the au. Though Newton is no physicist his book is very interesting This uote from Newton s contemporary Nicolas Malebranche sums up much of Gleick s excellent biography Newton is to us a towering figure arguably the single greatest scientist who ever lived in fact he was so influential that science as we know it owes an incalculable debt to his vision He didn t so much invent the modern way of looking at the world as he tore down the existing worldview categorically proved it to be lacking and then single handedly constructed a new view To people like Malebranche speaking of Newton s masterwork the Philosophi Naturalis Principia Mathematica this change was simply too much Newton wasn t a scientist because he so radically redefined what the term even meantGleick captures this cataclysm and rebirth in a way that is elegant engaging and entertaining His prose is almost poetic in how much meaning is conveyed per word and the book has the feel of a finely crafted work of art It reads very easily while simultaneously communicating a huge amount of information truly the holy grail of science communicationThe book provides a chronological biography of Newton focusing less on the man himself and instead on his work his letters mathematics and publications letting the words speak for his personality As is often the case with great scientists it turns out that Newton was a bit of a dick In corresponding with several recurring characters he shows himself to be cold ruthless and brilliant A deep psychological analysis of his character is avoided here because that is available in other weightier tomes that frankly after this I have no interest in reading But enough is shown to convince at least this reviewer that Newton was a truly uniue strange individualThis brings me to the best comparison I can make to this book the excellent The Strangest Man by Graham Farmelo about Paul Dirac Newton and Dirac were similar in many ways and so are their biographies Where Farmelo succeeds compared to Gleick however is that he introduces an overarching theme or narrative to the book namely Dirac s relationship with his father Such a narrative thread is rather lacking from Gleick s biography which might be a conseuence of trying to condense things down to a brief format This does mean the book doesn t live up to it s full potential but it s not far shortA great biography meticulously researched beautifully written

  • Paperback
  • 288
  • Isaac Newton
  • James Gleick
  • English
  • 26 November 2018
  • 9781400032952